The Idaho Post
The Idaho Post
Contributed by Kathleen Peck Probasco

Date: August 23 1918

Newspaper published in: Moscow, Idaho

Source: University of Idaho Library

Sheriff J.J. Campbell has gone to Harvard where it is reported that Chas. Malcolm, who escaped from the asylum at Orofino nearly two years ago, is in hiding. The hiding place of the long-wanted man has been discovered and his capture before morning is expected. It is a mystery how Malcolm has lived since his escape from the asylum nearly two years ago. He is said to have been in hiding in the timber not far from Harvard and is believed to have had assistance from relatives.

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The casualty list contains among the killed, the name of Jack B. Taylor, son of Jack Taylor, of Weiser, Idaho.

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A Moscow woman is to be entertained by the Grand Army veterans at Portland next week, having accepted an invitation to attend the encampment because of the fact that she is believed to be the only living woman who was regularly enlisted in the Federal army during the civil war.

The woman is Mrs. Alwilda Smith, who makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Lieuallen, of Moscow. She is 76 years old and very active and well preserved. She spends her time knitting for the soldiers and has knitted 25 sweaters and dozens of pairs of socks.

Mrs. Smith's husband was a member of the 71rd Indiana Volunteer Infantry during the civil war. He was wounded at Galetin, Tennessee and when Mrs. Smith learned of this she started to join him. At Indianapolis, Indiana, she was stopped, as no civilians were permitted to go south. She appealed to Governor Morton, who took an interest in her case but discovered that only "enlisted men" could go through the lines. He informed her of the rulings and she offered to enlist and did so, being enrolled as a private. She was then permitted to continue her journey.

On arriving at Galetin, Tennessee, Mrs. Smith was taken to the outskirts of the city for the night as an attack before morning was expected. The streets were blocked with every kind of vehicle or article that would block traffic.

In the morning she was taken to the hospital where her husband was being cared for and she enrolled as a nurse and was made matron in charge. She continued in charge of hospitals in the war zone for many months during which Mr. Smith recovered. She was then transferred to Louisville, Kentucky and later sent to Indianapolis to the Soldiers Home there and remained at the home until the war closed when she was discharged with the other Federal soldiers.

After the war Mr. and Mrs. Smith raised a family, and two of the sons served through the Spanish-American war and one is now in France. Mr. Smith died a good many years ago and she makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Lieuallen, whose only son, Merrit, is in the navy and has been nominated by congressman...T. Smith, of Idaho, for Anapolis. Since the war with Germany began she has been "doing her bit" by knitting and works constantly. She goes to Portland "to see the boys of '65 and enjoy another visit with them," to use her own words.

Mrs. Smith was the first president of the Women's Relief Corps, of the state of Idaho, and was also the first president of the Idaho State Rebekah assembly. She is one of the most active members of both of these organizations and, despite her age, never misses attending a meeting of either of them.

She leaves Moscow Monday evening for Portland and while there will be a guest of the Perkins hotel. She expects to remain for the entire encampment and hopes to meet some of the wounded she nursed during the Civil war.

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Harry W. Robertson, of near Harvard, was brought to town by Sheriff Campbell, on a charge of assault and battery preferred by his wife, Mattie J. Robertson. He put up a cash bond of $100 and was released. His hearing is set for August 29.

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Mabel Campbell, daughter of Fred Campbell, the dairyman, and Edgar Johnson, son of E. Johnson, well-known farmer, were married this week and went to Spokane on a brief honeymoon trip. They will make their home on Mr. Johnson's farm.

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Ira W. Havens and Elsie Jane Keene were married Sunday [August 18] by Rev. J. Quincy Biggs of the First Christian church. These newly weds have a host of friends who wish them a happy and prosperous life. They departed for Spokane where they will spend a few days, after which they will return to Moscow to make their home. [See marriage license below for Ira W. Horner.]

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Colfax--Green Smith, a well known pioneer of Colfax and Spokane, was instantly killed today while working for A. Guthrie and company, contractors, of Portland, who are constructing a concrete tunnel three miles from Colfax on the Inland Empire electric line. Foreman I.W. Smith and Conductor A.A. Watts, who were near Smith, stated that the lumber in the concrete form gave way, crushing Smith. Coroner L.L. Bruning will investigate the cause of the accident.

Mr. Smith lived at Colfax a number of years and was a skilled mechanic, having invented the Green Smith weeder and other farm implements. For the past several years he has resided at Thirteenth avenue and Ivory street, Spokane. He is survived by his widow, three daughters and two sons, all residing at Spokane.

Floyd Smith, a son, is with the Globe Milling company, of Spokane, and a daughter, Mrs. Paul Pattison, is the wife of the former prosecuting attorney of Whitman county.

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A marriage license was issued Saturday to Ira W. Horner and Elsie Jane Keene, both of Moscow. [See notice of marriage of Ira W. Havens above.]

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W.H. Cameron, an attorney of Centralia, Wash., is in Moscow today. He is attorney for the administrator of the estate of Lyles Hopkins, who died recently at Centralia. Deceased owned 160 acres of land valued at $15,000 in Latah county. It is located in The Cove district, east of Palouse. The widow, Ollie Jane Hopkins is administrator of the estate and legatee of the property in Washington, Idaho, and Montana.

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Many friends here of Meride Greene will be grieved to learn of her death at Palouse on Wednesday, August 15th, after an illness of several months, resulting from a severe attack of typhoid fever. She was a student of the University of Idaho in 1914 and a member of the Delta Gamma sorority. She was a sister of Ralph Greene, a graduate of the University in 1917. A simple funeral service was held at Palouse last Saturday, after which the body was shipped to Spokane for burial.

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Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Sletto are the proud parents of a fine baby boy, born Monday, August 19.

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Harvard--Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Burch and daughters and son of Spokane visited last week with Mr. Burch's sister, Mrs. B.F. Pearson, and his niece, Mrs. W.J. Parker, and Mrs. E.S. Cook. Mr. and Mrs. Burch are the father and mother of Charles Burch, the Spokane boy who so heroically gave his life for his country on the battlefield in France, June 16. They take the death of their son in a thoroughly patriotic American manner. Reconciled to the fact that the young man made the greatest of all sacrifices doing his duty, facing the foe in the struggle to make the world a safe place in which to live.

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Princeton--Mrs. H.L. Hawkins spent several days last week with her son, R.E. [Hawkins], celebrating the berth [sic] of a daughter born the 14th.

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Princeton--Grandpa Vitt died last night at the home of his son Rufus. The funeral will be held Wednesday at 2 p.m. Interment in the Mendenhal cemetery.

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Princeton--Mr. A.J. Rule returned from Missouri, where he was called by the death of his brother. He brought his sister home with him. She will make her home with him.

Submitted: 01/19/06

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