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The Idaho Post
The Idaho Post
Contributed by Kathleen Peck Probasco

Date: May 16 1919

Newspaper published in: Moscow, Idaho

Source: University of Idaho Library

Wm. James Kelly, a native of the Isle of Man, now a farmer near Troy was granted his naturlization papers by the federal court.

The application of Edner Corkill for naturalization as a citizen of the United States was carried over to the next term of court.

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Judge W.G. Barge united in marriage at his office on Third street, at o'clock today [sic], W.H. Weller of San Jose, and Ruth Campbell of Los Angeles, Calif. The young couple left at 3:15 for Spokane where they will make their home.

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A quiet wedding occurred at the Baptist parsonage, Wednesday [May 14] when Miss Edna Bunney of Princeton became the bride of Eugene Cochrane of Harvard. The young couple are well known in their section of the county. Mr. Cochrane but recently returned from the east where with his company he was ready to embark for overseas service. He is farming between Princeton and Harvard where the young people will take up their residence.

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Charles White was shot and killed by Neil McMeekin at Wind River, about 20 miles form Riggins, beyond Grangeville several days ago. White had sold his ranch to McMeekin and the men had gone to the ranch from Grangeville for the purpose of making the transfer. It is said they quarreled about the personal property and that White attacked McMeekin with a pick when McMeekin shot White, killing him instantly. It took two days of hard riding on horseback and by stage for McMeekin to reach Grangeville where he gave himself up. He had notified the sheriff by telephone and the sheriff and coroner met him on the road. McMeekin proceeded on to Grangeville and surrendered to the sheriff's office while the sheriff and coroner proceeded to the scene of the shooting.

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B.E. Lawrence, who is probably the oldest resident of Moscow, celebrated his 90th birthday, April 16. Mr. Lawrence was born in New York in 1829, is a veteran of the Civil War and has lived in Moscow 24 years, where he is well known.

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Miss Gladys Holden, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Holder [sic], 744 South Logan street, entertained 12 of her girl friends, Friday afternoon [May 9] at a very pretty party, celebrating her 12th birthday anniversary.

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A wedding service was enacted today [May 13] at the Methodist parsonage, Rev. Perry officiating, uniting in marriage Henry Heidke of Boville and Helen Vanlew of Spokane. Mr. and Mrs. Heidke will reside at Bovill.

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In the district court a suit for divorce has been filed by Jessie Tracy against Harry Tracy on the charge of cruel and inhuman treatment. The parties were married at Moscow in May, 1918.

A suit for divorce has been filed by Hazel Bolon May against Claude A. May on the charge of cruel and inhuman treatment. The couple were married in Lewiston, March 8, 1917. The plaintiff asks for the care of the only child.

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Eric Alfred Alsterlund, a native of Sweden, has petitioned the court for naturalization papers. Mr. Alsterlund is an employee of the Potlatch Lumber company at Potlatch.

Gottfred Harry Hansen, a native of Norway, has petitioned to become a citizen of the United States. He is a resident of Potlatch.

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Mr. G. Rushing has just received a telegram from Washington stating that his son, Sergt. Douglas G. Rushing was killed in action in France on November first. Sergeant Rushing enlisted in the marine corps two years before our entry into the war and was promoted rapidly until he was sergeant in the machine gun battalion. He was in this service at the time he was killed in action.

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Carmel C. Carpenter was born in Dubuque county, Iowa, in the year 1845, passed away April 30, 1919, age 74 years and three days. He comes of a staunch English stock, his great grand father having fought in the Revolutionary war. He was one of the first to inlist in the War of the Rebellion and for four years fought for the maintenance of the Union.

In the year 1869 he was married to Miss Amy Randall, who has been his constant companion until his decease.

In the year 1880 Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter, with their children, came to Idaho, the Gem of the Mountains. They came directly to their present home, seven and one-half miles south of town, and homesteaded. For 39 years they have spent their lives in helping to make what was then a wilderness. Mr. Carpenter has had no small part in making this country what it is. Mr. Carpenter leaves to mourn his loss two brothers and four sisters. They are now living in Kansas, Missouri, Colorado and Idaho. He leaves his faithful companion, Mrs. Amy Carpenter, and three daughters, Mrs. Nellie Hall, Moscow; Mrs. Jennie Smith, Buhl; Mrs. Leona Myers, Uniontown, and two sons, Jesse and Arthur Carpenter, who are running the home ranch.

No words can properly express the debt of the present generations to men who came to this country and gave themselves to making it as has Mr. Carpenter.

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Dr. Adair reports the birth of daughters of Mr. and Mrs. M.M. Sangstad, living in the northeastern part of town; and to Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Sudderth, five miles northeast of town, yesterday.

Submitted: 02/26/06

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