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The Idaho Post
The Idaho Post
Contributed by Kathleen Peck Probasco

Date: December 31 1920

Newspaper published in: Moscow, Idaho

Source: University of Idaho Library

The first fatality from smallpox since the disease made its appearance here in epidemic form last June, occurred Monday night [December 27] when Clark Joseph Cameron, 17-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Cameron, 634 East B street, died as a result of the disease. He had been ill for some time and all members of the family have had the disease, but in a mild form. the funeral will be held privately Wednesday forenoon, brief services being held at the grave.

That the disease has been in Moscow since last June is the statement of Dr. F.M. Leitch, city health officer, who gave out the following statement concerning the disease and the best methods of handling or preventing it. Dr. Leitch's statement follows:

The first cases of smallpox of the present epidemic were reported the latter part of June. Since that time forty-eight homes in Moscow have been under quarantine with from one to eight cases in each home. As a rule the cases have been of a mild type with an occasional severe case. Only one death has occurred so far; that of Mr. Cameron's son who died last night. Some cases are so mild that a number of persons have been sent home form the streets with the eruption fully developed and some cases have gone entirely through the course of the disease before it was known to the health officers and were not under quarantine when they should have been. There are a number of cases in the country surrounding Moscow and if common reports are true, persons form the country are coming into Moscow from homes where there are smallpox cases. Under such circumstances it is utterly impossible for Moscow health officers to protect the general public from coming in contact with the disease with a liability of contracting it. Every known case of smallpox in Moscow has been placed under quarantine and the quarantine as strictly maintained as could be done without guards and with a few exceptions regulations have been fully respected. Vaccination for smallpox is effective in all persons varying from a period of two years to a life time. To be surely effective vaccination should be done within a period of three days after exposure, but if done as late as six days it will modify if it does not prevent the disease. To my personal knowledge four persons recently vaccinated at a late date had modified cases of smallpox but with those four exceptions of all the cases in Moscow only one case occurred in a person who had previously been vaccinated, thus clearly proving how nearly effective in every case vaccination proves itself to be against the disease. Authorities in Boise have written me to strongly urge upon the people the necessity of a general vaccination in order thereby to stamp out the disease.

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Alfred Lydig, a native of Sweden, Svein Alsager, Ernest Margedo Gunderson, Lars Pederson Lande, natives of Norway, have filed their petitions for naturalization with the clerk of the district court. the applicants are residents of Potlatch, Idaho, where they are employed by the Potlatch Lumber Company. The hearing of petitions has been set for April 9, 1921.

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Juliaetta--It is reported that Mrs. Bessie Shrewsberry died in a hospital in Seattle Wednesday, following an operation. Deceased was formerly a resident of Juliaetta and was a sister of Marion, Levi and Gover Groseclose of this locality.

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Cora--A baby girl was added to the family of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Anderson, December 15th.

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Monday [December 27] was a record day for weddings with Judge Adrian Nelson, of the probate court, when he performed three marriage ceremonies during the afternoon. The happy couples were Harry Tracy and Miss Hulda Liner, both of Helmer, who were accompanied by the bride's mother; William H. Connell, of Greer, Idaho, and Miss Zelma E. Dickinson of Potlatch, who were accompanied by the bride's mother, Mrs. Emma Dickinson and Mrs. G.W. Westover, of Potlatch; and the third couple was Robert Lawrence Marshall, of Chicago and Miss Julia Malissa Wilson, of Lewiston. The last couple were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Howard Plummer, of Moscow.

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Word was received in Moscow of the marriage in Spokane of Miss Vida Robinson to Lawrence Richards Friday. Both are well known in this city, Mr. Richards having been connected with the vocational training department of the University of Idaho. They are reported to be on their honeymoon on the coast.

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Born to Rev. and Mrs. Maddox, Monday, December 20, a daughter.

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A marriage license was issued Monday at Coeur d'Alene to W.U. Patoon, age 24, of Spokane; and Fern Millwood, age 19, of Moscow, according to the Coeur d'Alene Evening Press.

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Miss Hazel B. Ross was married to E.L. Cone today, the wedding taking place in the parlors of the Hotel Idaho. Rev. H.O. Perry officiated on this happy occasion. Both the contracting parties are residents of the Princeton country, to where they will return tomorrow to be present at a gathering of the families of the bride and groom.

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Mrs. Frank Oberg has just received the news of the death of her mother, Mrs. J.T. Stevenson, of Escanaba, Mich. She leaves behind to mourn her loss, a husband, J.T. Stevenson, a daughter, Mrs. F. Oberg, of Moscow, Idaho, a daughter, Mrs. Alex Gunderson, Escanaba, Mich., and a son in Chicago, Ill, C.J. Stevenson, besides a host of friends. She had lived at Escanaba for 36 years. In November, had she lived, would have occurred her golden wedding anniversary.

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Dr. D.A. MacEachern and Miss Pearl Mowlds of Potlatch, Idaho, were united in marriage December 22 by Dean Hicks of All Saints' cathedral at Spokane. Dr. MacEachern is a graduate of North Pacific dental college, Portland, Oregon. The bride is the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mowlds, pioneer residents of the Potlatch country. After a short trip to the coast they will return to their home at Potlatch.

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Marriage licenses: Harry Tracy, Helmer and Hulda Liner, Helmer; William H. Connell, Greer and Velma E. Dickinson, Potlatch; Robert Lawrence Marshall, Chicago and Julia Malissa Wilson, Lewiston; Glen A. Fields and Buelah [sic] Roberts both of Clarkston; Keifferd O. Marlett and Ermina L. Scott both of Moscow; Jacob Kae Hudson, Milton, Oregon and Arlena Combes, Pullman; Raymond A. Rice, Potlatch and Violet L. Darrow, Garfield.

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It was a sad Christmas for P.G. Beck and children, their mother, Mrs. Melisa Beck, being called home Christmas night. She had been ill for some time, being a sufferer from tuberculosis and complications, and while her death was not unexpected, it was a blow, nevertheless, coming on the day when the whole world is supposed to be happy. The funeral was held from the Methodist church Tuesday at 11 o'clock, the Rev. H.O. Perry conducting the services. Interment was in the Moscow cemetery. Mrs. Beck leaves a husband, several children and a host of friends to mourn her departure. The family have lived in the neighborhood of Evergreen school house, east of Moscow, for several years.

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Edward Stanley, pioneer of Coeur d'Alene has died. He was one of the gallant pioneers who aided in quelling the last Nez Perce Indian rising. For many years the late Mr. Stanley was an orchardist, his home ranch being among the show places of the section.

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Sunday was the 25th anniversary of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Abin Johnson, who live three miles south of Moscow, and in commemoration of the happy event between 50 and 60 of their friends and neighbors, many of whom have known the estimable couple for a quarter of a century, invaded their home, and took them by surprise. A delightful time was had and the unbidden guests left some very nice presents as tokens of the esteem in which Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are held.

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Charges with assault with a deadly weapon with intent to commit murder, Lester Berry, aged 22, an ex-soldier, is in the county jail awaiting trial. The complaint was sworn to by Henry Berry, a brother of the prisoner, who charges that his brother attacked him with his own (Henry's) revolver, after the brother had taken the gun from Henry's own home and bought a box of cartridges for it. The alleged assault is said to have occurred in Henry Berry's home.

The brothers had not met since the younger was 12 years old, until recently, when, according to the story told to the officers, Henry sent for his brother to come to Moscow and make his home. Lester was taken into his brother's home and became one of the family. In fact, according to the story told the sheriff, Lester became so much "one of the family" that the older brother, husband and father, felt that he was being supplanted. The affair came to a climax this morning when the two brothers went to work at the Auto Sales and Service Company's garage where Henry is in charge of the repair work and operates the shop. Lester is said to have had his brother's revolver, which Henry had owned for six years but for which he had never had any cartridges, buckled on him with a belt.

According to the story told the sheriff's office by Henry he left his brother at the garage and went to his home "to talk it over with his wife" and while they were talking Henry says he saw his brother sneaking around the house. Henry says he went to the rear door and asked his brother to come in and "talk it over." He says the brother came in with his hand on the revolver. Henry says he talked the matter under discussion over with his wife and brother and both made damaging admissions. It was finally agreed that Lester would leave but he demanded $200 before 2 o'clock, according to the sworn testimony of Henry and declared that he would kill his brother unless that sum was paid him before 2 o'clock.

Henry says he told Lester he could not raise that much money by that time and that Lester agreed to take $100 at 2 o'clock, with the threat that "I will kill you if you don't have the money here by that time." Henry left, on the pretense of going to get the money and swore out a warrant for his brother's arrest. Deputy Sheriff Summerfield made the arrest. L.G. Peterson, office deputy in the sheriff's office, says that Summerfield gained admittance to the house by a ruse and handed the warrant to Lester. Peterson says that when Summerfield told Lester it was a warrant Lester reached for his gun, but Summerfield, who held his gun in his right hand while handing the warrant to Lester with his left, was too quick for the young ex-soldier and had his gun against the latter abdomen before Lester could draw his gun. Lester's hands shot up and he was placed under arrest.

At the sheriff's office the two brothers and Mrs. Henry Berry held a consultation. The husband and wife have reconciled their differences and returned home together. They have two children, both bright boys, aged four and six years.

H. Berry is manager of the repair shop of the Auto Sales and Service Company, and, according to the statement of C.A Tenwick, proprietor of the garage, has always been a hardworking, industrious man and Mr. Tenwick says Berry has always turned over his entire earnings to his wife. All of the parties agreed that Henry Berry and his wife got along well together until the brother was taken into their home.

Submitted: 01/03/09

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