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The Idaho Post
The Idaho Post
Contributed by Kathleen Peck Probasco

Date: January 7 1921

Newspaper published in: Moscow, Idaho

Source: University of Idaho Library

Earl Grady has been granted a degree [sic] of divorce, in the district court from Crystal Grady and the custody of the minor child, Charles Gerald. The complaint upon which the decree was granted alleged that the parties were married at Lewiston, Idaho, December 27, 1916 and that defendant Crystal Grady, in August 1918, disregarding the solemnity of the marriage contract, deserted and abandoned plaintiff against his will and without his consent.

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Horace J. Mileham, who thought life was not worth living without his wife, with whom he had lived but five days when she left him to enter the University of California at Berkeley, and shot himself through the body just below the heart when she refused to come to Moscow and join him here, has decided that she is not actually necessary to life and happiness and has asked the court to grant him a divorce.

He has filed suit in the district court of Latah county charging desertion and asking for absolute divorce from Esther Mileham, to whom he was married at Farmington, Utah, August 15, 1919. The complaint charges that the couple were married at Farmington, Utah, on August 15, 1919 and that on August 20, after five days of married bliss, "the wife deserted and abandoned the plaintiff and has since lived separate and apart from said plaintiff and continues to so live separate and apart from him."

Mileham is an ex-service man. He was gassed in the battle front in France and after a few days in a hospital returned to the front when the larger part of one hip was torn away by a shell. After months in hospitals in France and the United States, he finally reached his home at Salmon City, Idaho, where a childhood love affair was resumed and when the young woman was ordered by her mother ot go to Berkeley Mileham went ahead and joined her enroute and they stopped off at Farmington, Utah, and were married. After spending five days together the bride resumed her journey and Mileham came to Moscow and entered the University of Idaho as a vocational training student.

When his bride refused to join him here he went to see her at Berkeley. He claims she promised to come to Moscow with him but after spending one night at a Berkeley hotel left to bid her sorority sisters good-bye and he was unable to see her again. Returning to Moscow he shot himself through the body but has apparently regained his health and strength.

The story resulted in so much publicity that the bride left Berkeley and Mr. Mileham says she is now attending the University of Washington at Seattle. He visited her there several months ago and says that he finds he is able to live without her.

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Colfax, Wash.--W.J. Trimble, age 49, professor of history at the University of Idaho, who was spending the holidays at the home of his wife's mother, Mrs. S.S. Hale, west of Steptoe, died suddenly New Year's day of nervous trouble.

Professor Trimble was married in Colfax 14 years ago to Miss Maybelle Hale and went to the agricultural college at Fargo, N.D., where he was head of the history department for 12 years, this being his second year at the University of Idaho. He is survived by his widow, a son, Stairett, age 12, and a daughter, Elizabeth, who was 9 years old yesterday. He is also survived by several brothers and sisters, State Representative Trimble of Palouse being a brother.

The above dispatch received from Colfax brought the news of the sudden death of a popular member of the faculty of the University of Idaho. Professor Trimble and family had gone to Steptoe to celebrate New Year's day and the birthday of their daughter with Mrs. Trimble's relatives. Professor Trimble had not been in good health for some time, owing to a nervous breakdown, due to overwork, but his condition was not regarded as at all serious. His sudden collapse is charged to heart failure and came as a severe blow to his hosts of friends here.

The funeral was held at Colfax at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon and was attended by a number of Moscow citizens and members of the university faculty. The pall bearers were L.F. Parsons, executive secretary of the university; Deans Hulme, Eldredge, and Thomson; Professor Alvin E. Evans and A.H. Oversmith. Interment was at Colfax.

Professor Trimble was a man of many splendid qualities and had a host of friends. He was regarded as an authority on history, and had written a history of the northwest that is said to have been one of the most accurate and interesting histories of this section ever written. He came here two years ago last summer to assist in the summer session and was employed as a member of the staff, where he won favor with all connected with the university and was popular with faculty members and students as well as townspeople. Mrs. Trimble and the children have the heartfelt sympathy of a host of friends.

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Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Beardsley celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary New Year's day. They were united in marriage at Woodstock, Illinois, January 1, 1861, and have lived in the same house in Moscow, 309 N. Washington street, for 31 years, with the exception of one year spent in California. They have never had any children but adopted a daughter, who is now Mrs. W.H. Holley, living a short distance from Moscow and who, with her family, assisted her foster parents in celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Beardsley are hale and hearty and Mr. Beardsley goes around Moscow as well as many men 30 years younger. He is 84 years old and comes from a long lived family. He had one brother who lived to be 87 years old; another, who was 90, and a third who was 97; and has a sister 86. He enjoys good health. Many friends who have known Mr. and Mrs. Beardsley for nearly a third of a century called upon them during the day.

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Thorn Creek--The little baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. John Morros of Colton died December 27th from pneumonia. Mrs. John Jacksha of Thorn Creek has been in attendance at the home of her sister, Mrs. John Morros, during the sickness of the Morros baby.

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Kendrick (from Kendrick Gazette)--Mr. and Mrs. George Slind and daughter, of Clarkston, arrived Saturday afternoon to visit relatives and to be present at the marriage of Mr. Slind's sister, Miss Mayme [Slind], which took place at the Slind home on Big Bear ridge on Christmas day.

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Cora--Mr. and Mrs. Reid Messenger are the happy parents of a baby girl which arrived Tuesday, December 28th.

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Potlatch--The friends of Raymond A. Yates were horrified to learn Sunday afternoon of his sudden death at the home of Carrol Sanborn in Potlatch where he had been rooming while in the employ of the Potlatch Lumber Company at Potlatch. Mr. Yates was the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Yates for a number of years residents of Moscow, Idaho, but recently living on a homestead near Plummer, who together with a brother and sister in Iowa and a sister, Miss Ida Yates of Bonners Ferry, and Donald H. Yates of Potlatch, survive him.

Mr. Yates was a member of Moscow lodge of Elks, and that organization will have charge of the funeral which will be held at Potlatch at 12:30, Thursday. A delegation of Elks from Moscow will leave there on the morning electric train Thursday and return in time to catch the electric train at Palouse, reaching Moscow at 3:40 p.m. A male quartet from Potlatch will assist in the services, which will be conducted according to the ritual of the Elks lodge.

Mr. Yates was also a member of the American Legion, having served with the marines during the war and it is expected that a number of ex-soldiers and marines will attend the services in full uniform. Mr. Yates' father, J.W. Yates, lived in Moscow for a number of years, being employed by the Moscow steam laundry.

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Word has come to Potlatch of the death in Pullman last night of Mrs. C.L. McKarcher. Mrs. McKarcher with her family had made her home in Potlatch for many years and has many friends here who were shocked to get this news. About six weeks ago the family moved to Pullman and since that time she had been failing until about two weeks ago since when she has been confined to the bed. She is survived by her husband and three sons, Chalmers, Reginald, and Curtis, and two daughters, Dorothy and Helen.

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Thomas Sletto and Miss Merle Hopkins, both former residents of Moscow, were married recently at Kent, Washington, and are in Moscow for a brief honeymoon visit with relatives. Mr. Sletto is a son of Ole Sletto, retired farmer and well known pioneer of Moscow and a brother-in-law of J.W. Wilson, proprietor of the South Main street barber shop. The bride is a daughter of Eli Hopkins, well known pioneer. The happy couple are visiting these relatives for a short time after which they go to Canada, where they will make their home on a farm. Both have many friends and acquaintances in and near Moscow, where their relatives are among the well known pioneers of Latah county.

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Henry Winters of Bridge, Coos Co., Oregon, and Miss Florence Etta Rogers of Garfield, Washington, were married by Judge Nelson in his office at the court house Thursday [January 6]. The happy couple were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Edwards of Garfield, Washington, Mrs. Edwards being a sister of the bride. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers will make their home at Bridge, Oregon, where Mr. Rogers owns a large stock ranch.

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Probate Judge Adrian Nelson united in marriage at his office in the court house Wednesday [January 5], Lee C. Swartz and Miss Fredericka Westmann, both of Nezperce, Lewis county. They were attended by Miss Lillian Skattaboe, county superintendent, and John Canham, janitor of the court house. They will make their home on a farm near Nezperce.

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Mrs. Rachel J. Townsend, who recently celebrated her 89th birthday, has been a resident of Moscow and vicinity since the fall of 1878.

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John Rouse of Troy, and Miss Velma Green of Kendrick, were married at the Methodist parsonage New Year's eve. The newly married couple left the same evening for the farm home of the groom in the neighborhood of Troy to make their future home.

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A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. C.V. Clark, of Clinton precinct, on Thursday, December 30.

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Officers of Moscow lodge of Elks went to Potlatch Thursday morning to conduct the funeral services of Raymond Yates, whose death occurred at Potlatch Sunday night. The funeral was held at 12:30. Interment was at Potlatch. A quartet from Potlatch assisted the Elks in the funeral services. The Moscow delegation left Moscow on the early morning train on the electric railroad and will return on the evening train. A number of Elks from Palouse were expected to join the Moscow Elks there.

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Dr. O.C. Keller of Lewiston died Thursday morning [January 6], following an operation for appendicitis. Dr. Keller was an osteopathic physician and formerly lived at Troy. Some few years ago he was coroner in Moscow, having been a personal friend of Dr. W.M. Hatfield of Moscow since 1905. He had been in active practice at Lewiston for five years. He was a graduate of the American School of Osteopathy of Kirksville, Mo., of the class of 1906. Dr. Keller was a Mason and an Elk. He leaves a wife and four children.

Submitted: 01/03/09

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